Psychic Surgery and the New Science of Healing
Modern medical science believes in the body. It defines the skin as the boundary of the human being and everything within – blood, bone, muscle – as the essential reality of our existence. No subtler dimension of consciousness is acknowledged with the result that illness is viewed as a technical malfunction, a break down in the operation of a machine. Like a car with a punctured wheel. Do we have to accept this paradigm? Do we have to live with the thought that we are only mechanical, physical beings with no subtler, more spiritual existence?
The new science of healing says no. All over the planet, alternative physicians are working out of a completely different paradigm. A paradigm, which sees the human being as made up of numerous levels of consciousness – or bodies – only the densest of which is the visible, physical. Healing, understood in this light, is not the fixing of a broken machine. It is the deeply human engagement of one soul with another, in which a doorway to wellness is opened by the healer’s loving interest in the patient’s total being – not merely her body and its ailments but what lie behind those in her mental, emotional and spiritual life.
Most advanced – and controversial – amongst alternative methods of healing is psychic surgery. In this approach, the healer operates directly on the subtle or “etheric” body of the patient, using physical instruments but without causing blood. It is an extraordinary experience. You may feel a small incision, a rooting around of fingers, something removed – but otherwise it is painless, easy. The surgeon does something seemingly impossible, yet experienced as real. From a mainstream perspective, of course, it can only be quackery. Wikipaedia defines psychic surgery as a “pseudo-science constituting medical fraud” and no doubt there are phony practitioners, making money out of the gullibility of the sick. But are there any real ones? Are there any psychic surgeons, whose results have been verified and whose reputation has survived the incredulity of doctors and sceptics?
Stephen Turoff is a psychic surgeon with a world-wide following and a history of “miraculous” healings as long as an NHS waiting list. All over the planet, people credit him with healing them of serious illnesses: cancers, organ dysfunctions, mental imbalances. He is reported to have removed tumours, repaired broken limbs, even raised the dead. Only John of God, the famous Brazilian healer, has accomplished anything comparable and even some mainstream doctors reluctantly acknowledge the evidence of his success.
Stephen’s explanation of his work is disarmingly humble. He confirms that he operates “etherically” and that the purpose of his surgery is to remove the causes of illness as they originate in the subtle bodies, rather than their manifestations in the physical. He says that he is guided by the “higher self” of his patients to understand their ailments and how to bring release from them. He says that he often receives direct insight into the soul-life of those that come to him – their sorrows, their struggles – and can speak therapeutically to those wounds. He says that currents of divine energy pass through him into the bodies of the sick with the potential to bring about profound healing but that, within that process, he is nothing more than the “instrument of God’s love” – the true source of healing, being the power that pours through him, rather than he himself.
Of course, such statements remain incomprehensible to medical orthodoxy and one is entitled to treat them with caution. It is interesting, though, that certain scientific “proofs” have been put forward to corroborate Stephen’s words. Photographs, taken by his patients, show beams of light, leaving his hands or surrounding his head in the shape of a halo. Tests on his brain-wave activity show him to be constantly in a state of non-functioning, otherwise defined as comatose. Similar tests on Buddhist meditation masters have revealed comparable – but not as profound – states of mental calm. So – even within the materialist paradigm, in which things must be seen to be believed – there is evidence for Stephen’s authenticity and the form of surgery he practises.
But perhaps the best proof is our human experience. What do our own lives tell us about the nature of healing and the validity of new approaches? Probably the truth is that many people have found mainstream medicine distressingly inhuman. Probably many people have felt depressingly anonymous in the presence their GP: their symptoms scanned on a computer, the right pills prescribed without a meeting of eyes or the sensation of a genuine, human encounter. Probably many people have been wheeled around a hospital like a broken automobile. For despite the efforts of doctors and nurses, it seems that the art of medicine has degenerated into something grimly mechanised and impersonal. Shortages of funding may be to blame; but beyond that, more fundamentally, there seems to be a basic undervaluing of the human being – an underlying paradigm that fails to reckon with the subtler dimensions of consciousness. A medicine that deals in pills and computers – but never the real substance of well-being.
Against this reductionist approach stands psychic surgery and all those who practise alternative forms of healing. Based upon a holistic, spiritual vision, these approaches place supreme emphasis upon the sacredness of the human being. They recognise the importance of human encounter in the healing process. They believe in a divine, underlying power and hold that that this force, flowing between people, is the profoundest source of health.
Humanity is surely sicker than ever. Mainstream medicine cannot comprehend, let alone remedy the proliferating diseases . Perhaps it is time to open our minds to a new science of healing?